• Fun ways to learn math facts


     

    • Flashcards - Children write each fact on an index card.  They practice the facts in a random order.

     

    • Fact memory game - Children write each fact problem (no answer) on an index card and the answer to the fact on a different index card.  On the back of the fact problem card write a P (problem) and on the back of the answer card write A (answer).  Each card is placed on a table with the P and A facing up. Children take turns with an adult or another child turning over a P and an A card.  If the cards match/belong together, the player gets to keep both cards and go again. If the cards does not match/belong together, the player says the fact and correct answer and the next player takes their turn.  The winner of the game is the player with the most cards.

     

    • Fact War - Children use their fact flashcards.  Each player turns over a card at the same time and the player with the higher sum/difference/product/quotient card takes both cards and puts them, face down, on the bottom of their stack.  If the cards have the same sum/difference/product/quotient, it is "War".  Each player turns up one card face down and one card face up. The player with the higher sum/difference/product cards takes both piles (six cards).  The player with the most cards win the game.

     

    • Rainbow writing - A paper is divided into 4 parts.  Each fact is written in one of the 4 boxes on the paper.  Children write each fact 5 times using a different color each time they write the fact in a box.

     

    • Sand practice - Sand is placed in a box or container with high sides, which works for both storage and fact practice.  Children write each fact in the sand.  They wipe the fact away and practice the next fact.  Sand and containers can be purchased at the Dollar Store, Michaels, AC Moore, or Home Depot.  

     

    • Jell-O practice - Jell-O powder is placed on a cookie sheet or in a box.  Children wet their finger and write each fact in the Jell-O.  They wipe the fact away and practice the next fact. Please note that some families find this strategy to be very messy and challenging to clean-up if the Jell-O gets outside of the cookie sheet or box.

     

    • Shaving cream practice - Shaving cream is placed on a cookie sheet or on a table (great way to clean a surface).  Children write each fact in the shaving cream.  They wipe the fact away and practice the next fact.  While children do need to clean-up the shaving cream when done, it is typically a quick and easy process.

     

    • Jump and Say - Line the flashcards in a straight row with space in between on the floor.  Jump to each flashcard and say the problem and answer.  When you are finished the line, you can shuffle the flashcards and lay them in a circle or square.

     

    • Climb the Stairs –  Use your fact flashcards. Draw a staircase a piece of paper -or- use an actual set of stairs in your home to play this fun game. You will need to have two to five more flashcards than you have stairs. The more extra cards you have, the more chances you will have to win. If you are using paper stairs, use a marker (button, penny, paperclip). If you are using stairs in your home, you move yourself. When you answer a question correctly, move your marker or yourself to the next stair. If the answer is incorrect, it is okay – you just stay put and wait for your next turn. This can also work with two players. Just double the number of cards and take turns, making sure everyone gets the same number of turns. Either the first one to the top will win or there will be a tie.

     

    • Touch  – Use your fact flashcards. All of the flashcards are laid on the table face up. Each round a different player calls out a number. • The other players “touch” the flashcard with that answer. The first player to “touch” the correct card, gets a point! The player with the most points wins the game, but everyone had fun.

     

    • Dice Colored Dice: - Pick up a bag of colored dice at a local pharmacy or dollar store.  Children roll the dice and either add or multiply the two numbers to practice their facts.  This is an easy game for them to do while you are making dinner or even sitting at a restaurant.  You can play against each other and keep score of who has the greatest sum (+) or product (x).  As your children get older, you can incorporate different colors to mean different operations.  For example: choose 2 red dice and 1 white:  Roll all 3 dice, add the 2 red dice, and then multiply by the white die.  This increases children's flexibility with numbers and speed as well.  Some parents keep dice in their bag in case they are stuck waiting somewhere!  

     

    • Photograph of Math War Math War - Using either a deck of playing cards or a deck you've made out of index cards, play "war" to practice facts.  Split the cards between the two players.  Turn over the top two cards – you can either add, subtract (keeping positive answers), or multiply the two cards to see who wins.  The winner takes all 4 cards, and you play again just like the traditional card game of war.  Whoever has the most cards at the end wins!  Again, it's a very easy game to keep in the car or your bag so learning is always near.

     

    • I know cards I Know Cards - This is a great way to help with the facts that your child gets stuck on every time!  There are always those tough facts that students just sometimes can't remember, so making "I know cards" will help them come up with a strategy for finding the answer.  For example: to help with 6 x 7 = 42, have your child write on an index card or piece of paper, "I know 6 x 6 is 36, so I add one more group of 6: 36 + 6 = 42, so 6x7=42".  Your child can use whatever strategy he or she likes but the focus is on what s/he already knows, not what s/he doesn't know.  You can hang the "I know cards" in their rooms or read through them weekly.

     


    Source: https://www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/learning-toolkit-blog/making-math-facts-fun.html